Sedana Medical Research Grant

One of the missions for Sedana Medical is to improve patient outcome through medical innovation. Sedana Medical Research Grant (SMRG), established in 2019, is an integral part of this mission. This is an opportunity for the scientific community to increase its understanding of sedation in critically ill patients in intensive care.

Up to three individual academic researchers will be awarded a grant of between €10 000 and €30 000 per year, for up to two years. The grant will put priority on research targeting the effects of inhaled anaesthetics in mechanically ventilated patients.

Application process

The grant for 2022 will put priority on research targeting the effects of inhaled anaesthetics in mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care. High priority will be put to projects investigating the effects of isoflurane. However, well-formulated applications for other sedation-related research may also receive funding.

Applications that do not follow the instructions or are submitted after the deadline will not be assessed.

Up to three individual academic researchers will be awarded a grant of between €10 000 and €30 000 per year, for up to two years.

Application review process

All applications will be assessed by a committee. All project information besides the abstract, the applicant information, and the photo will remain confidential.

Granted applications will be presented on Sedana Medical´s website. Please send your application with the research project headings below to SMRG@sedanamedical.com no later than 21 July 2022.

We welcome your application.

Awarded Projects

SMRG 2021 Peter Vernon Van Heerden

Peter Vernon van Heerden, MD PhD & Akiva Nachshon, MD

Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Comparison of inhaled versus intravenous sedation in a general intensive care unit

SMRG 2021 Guy William Glover Luigi Camporota

Luigi Camporota, MD PhD & Guy William Glover, MBChB FRCA FFICM DICM

Guys and St Thomas’ NHS Trust, London, UK

Effect of volatile sedation on spontaneous breathing during mechanical ventilation for patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome